Looking @ Coordinating Collection, Curriculum, and Library Lessons

Looking @ Coordinating Collection, Curriculum, and Library Lessons - As school librarians, it's our responsibility to develop a library collection that doesn't rely on generic 'balance,' but one that supports our grade level curricula. More than that, we must also create Library Lessons that use those materials for meaningful classroom activities and worthwhile assessments. #NoSweatLibrary #schoollibrary #librarycollection #librarylessons #socialstudies #ELASchool Librarians develop a school library collection based on the curriculum needs of teachers and students, not a ‘balanced’ collection based on arbitrary numbers of some purported authority. We know that we are the authority for our school library and better able to determine our print and digital needs than anyone else. We must be bold enough to trust our own judgment—to ignore ‘balance’ and support as much of our school’s curriculum as possible.

But it’s not enough to just add materials based on topics of study in the classroom. We must think deeply about how we can integrate resources into classroom experiences so they are actively used by students and teachers…and that means anticipating Library Lessons, especially those that bring authenticity and higher-order thinking to assessment products. Let’s follow the development of one such example.

BEGIN WITH CURRICULUM ALIGNMENT

Early on I begin to apply subject sticker-labels on fiction books to aid student choices. I notice a significant number of historical fiction books covering the same time period our 8th graders study in U.S. History—discovery of the Americas through Reconstruction. Instead of the Historical Fiction label, I put a distinct Historical America sticker on those books, already thinking I can promote them to 8th graders during their library orientation.

Around the same time, I learn that 8g English Language Arts does a novel study each semester using a classic historical fiction novel with a tie-in to Social Studies. It occurs to me that a novel study might be more interesting if students could choose their own individual Historical America book to read, and I store this in my mind as a possible Library Lesson.

DEVELOP THE TOPICAL COLLECTION

Though we have a considerable number of suitable historical books, there aren’t quite enough for the whole grade level. Determined to increase the Historical America collection, I run a report for relevant books owned by other district middle school libraries, but not ours (we’re only a couple years old), and find a good number to purchase right away.

Periodically combing through book reviews for good books of the time period adds titles to my acquisition book list. About this time one of our major book vendor representatives shows me how to do various searches in the online book vendor catalog. I perform one for “Popular” (which is as it sounds, the most popular titles purchased by other librarians) and filter for “Historical Fiction” and “U.S. History” which adds more titles to the book list.

Each year, as I begin my collection development, I search for newly published titles. As our school population increases, so does our special Historical America collection.

SEIZE A LESSON OPPORTUNITY

Eventually a new 8g Social Studies teacher approaches me…he wants students to “hear another voice of history” beyond the textbook by reading an historical fiction book. Because I thought ahead, I could show him our, by now, substantial collection of Historical America titles.

Looking @ Coordinating Collection, Curriculum, and Library Lessons - Looking @ Coordinating Collection, Curriculum, and Library Lessons - Make the school library collection relevant to curriculum with meaningful Library Lessons. Add Historical America subject sticker labels to historical fiction (from Discovery through Reconstruction), then promote a cross-discipline project to English Language Arts & U.S.History Social Studies with unique assessment products! #NoSweatLibrary #schoollibrary #librarycollection #ELA #socialstudiesWe plan the Library Lesson for shortly after the start of the 2nd semester. We’ll co-present the lesson to students, then allow them to move around the library to choose from the Historical America books I’ve arranged on tables. The U.S. History project criteria focus on the historical events of the story and how they align to what students study in class:

  • historical time period and location of the story
  • character’s conditions and lifestyle in historical context
  • political, economic, religious, environmental, or sociocultural issues of the historical event
  • historical accuracy of circumstances that lead to the character’s decisions

We decide students will have multiple product choices:

  • Academic – research paper or slideshow
  • Artistic – mural or foldable flipbook
  • Speaking – talk show interview or debate

REALIZE THE VISION

Returning from winter break, I discover the 8g English Language Arts teachers plan to assign a book report instead of doing the novel study. I see my initial plan coalesce: I approach ELA about the upcoming Social Studies Historical America project, and they agree that students can use the same book for both projects! I assure them we have enough books for the entire grade, with a few additions through Inter-Library Loan.

image of biocube-small sampleAlways alert for unique and meaningful assessments that fit with my lesson ideas, I’d found a Bio-Cube on ReadWriteThink that, with a few modifications for content, will be perfect for this assignment. I show the ELA teachers and they are delighted to use it. On each side of the cube students write “biographical” information about a chosen character from their historical story:

  1. character’s name and personality traits
  2. personal background
  3. time period and location of story
  4. significance in U.S. History
  5. biggest obstacle to overcome and pivotal choices (grading period theme) character makes
  6. important quotation from story

Copied to colorful paper, then cut & pasted together, finished cubes are suspended from the ceiling in the ELA classrooms. They are a real conversation starter for classroom visitors. Students also write a one-page summary of bio-cube information that contains a reflection segment.

THINK AHEAD

We’ve done this singly and as a cross-discipline project a few times over the years…all because I thought of a curricular Library Lesson and built a collection to implement it. I use the same process to build other mini-collections, such as earth and environmental books for science, print/audio book kits for ELL, and careers.

As school librarians, it’s our responsibility to develop a library collection that doesn’t rely on generic ‘balance,’ but one that supports our grade level curricula. More than that, we must also create Library Lessons that use those materials for meaningful classroom activities and worthwhile assessments.

line of books laying down - indicates end of blog article

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